Diabetes Education

Friends for Life - An Unforgettable Conference

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"One of the most magical times for people with diabetes happens every year in July, with the annual Friends For Life Conference hosted at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida."

Hosted at Disney's Coronado Springs Resort, the Friends for Life conference just wrapped up in July. This is the 20th anniversary of the conference! Friends for Life brings together an international group of world-renowned clinicians, researchers, physicians, adults, children, and families with diabetes, including siblings and children of adults with type 1 diabetes, to learn the most current information in diabetes care. At Friends for Life, participants have the opportunity to gather cutting edge ideas in diabetes management and share their stories to help motivate and inspire others who walk in the same shoes.

Learn more and maybe join the fun next year!

Managing Diabetes in the Heat

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Summer is finally heating up! The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) has some great guidance for understanding the effects of the heat and best practices for managing diabetes during the summer.

Feeling the Heat

People living with diabetes (type 1 and type 2) feel the heat more than others. Certain diabetes complications can affect sweat glands so that your body can't cool as effectively, and people with diabetes get dehydrated more quickly. Also, high temperatures can affect how your body uses insulin. The humidity also plays a part. It's harder to stay cool because sweat does not evaporate as well in high humidity. The CDC recommends checking the heat index and taking intentional steps to stay cool when it reaches 80°F in the shade with 40% humidity or above.

Summer Checklist

  • Drink plenty of water.

  • Test your blood sugar often.

  • Keep medicines, supplies, and equipment out of the heat.

  • Stay inside in air-conditioning when it’s hottest.

  • Wear loose, light clothing.

  • Get medical attention for heat-related illness.

  • Make a plan in case you lose power.

  • Have a go-bag ready for emergencies.

Read more details for managing summer heat here.

Developing Best Care Practices for Patients with Diabetes Undergoing Surgery

Tamra Dukatz, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist

Tamra Dukatz, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist

People with diabetes need special care in the surgical setting to control blood sugar. Tammy Dukatz, a certified registered nurse anesthetist at Beaumont Health, has spent a lot of time, with exceptional success, doing research to develop best care practices for patients with diabetes who are undergoing surgery. Tammy has been a nurse anesthetist for more than 25 years and a nurse for 40 years. For the last 15 years, she has taken a great interest in diabetes since two of her three children developed type 1 diabetes. Her research has been aimed at strategies for the best possible glycemic control during surgery. She credits her colleagues and the anesthesia department leadership with phenomenal interest and support for these projects.

Conducting research with endocrinologist Dr. Solomon Rosenblatt and other Beaumont Health staff members, Tammy brought the Hospital guidelines up to date to provide the most appropriate strategies for blood sugar control for people with diabetes having surgery. This is important because high glucose levels during surgery may cause electrolyte imbalances and dehydration, and lows are especially dangerous under anesthesia because signs and symptoms largely can't be observed. The clinical research study on insulin glargine dosing took place from 2005-2008, was published in 2012, and was centered at Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan.

Now Tammy and her team keep up the guidelines up-to-date. It's a constant – reviewing the anesthesia and diabetes literature for current diabetes tech and best practices. Recent updates in diabetes technology have brought up new questions and decisions to be made. For example, a patient’s home continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is based off interstitial glucose readings. CGM can be used in the hospital to follow the glucose trends, but patients are treated based on lab values using venous blood draws. Expert opinion is being sought to determine if hybrid closed loop insulin pumps should be kept in auto mode or put in manual mode during surgery.

Tammy has been working on her newest project with a team including her daughter, Gwen, who is a student nurse anesthetist at Oakland University. To make it easier for nurses to ensure accuracy, Dr. Rosenblatt and Gwen created an algorithm to guide insulin use after heart surgery. The whole team worked with Beaumont’s IT department to place the algorithm into an electronic calculator. A pilot was performed in one Beaumont department in September of 2018. For further refinement of this algorithm and help with back-end programming, they are soon to be working with the Oakland University College of Computer Science and Engineering. Tammy's son, Carl, has also been involved in the tech end of this project.

If you have diabetes and you're going into a surgery soon, here are some tips to keep in mind:

  1. It does matter how well you are controlling your diabetes before surgery - it can lead to better outcomes.

  2. If you are scheduled for elective surgery and you are not meeting your blood sugar goals, check with your diabetes care physician. Your physician may recommend medication changes to help prepare for the surgery.

  3. Anesthesia prescreening nurses will give you individualized instructions for the day of surgery. These should include what medications to take and how to handle high and low blood sugars before hospital arrival.

  4. Communicate well with your anesthesia team. Your blood sugar will be checked frequently throughout your surgery and recovery time. Because of the stress of surgery, treatment with insulin is common - even if you do not usually take insulin. Be sure to speak up if you feel that your blood sugar may be low.

Diabetes Myths Debunked from Beyond Type 2

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Have you heard about Beyond Type 2? We are big fans. This site is chock full of resources and guides for living with and understanding Type 2 diabetes. I want to point out the Diabetes Myths Debunked article. It covers a lot of territory and is definitely worth a read.

From Beyond Type 2... 11 Myths About Diabetes

Check out the entire article to find out the truth about these topics.

  1. Diabetes isn't that serious.

  2. You get Type 2 diabetes after you have been scared.

  3. Being overweight causes diabetes; thin people don't have diabetes.

  4. I can never eat sweets or my favorite foods again and have to follow a strict, bland diet.

  5. Diabetes doesn't run in my family, so I'm good to go.

  6. It's okay to stop taking my medication once my blood sugar is under control.

  7. Type 2 diabetes is a death sentence.

  8. Going on insulin means you "failed" at diabetes management.

  9. Type 2 diabetes can be cured.

  10. Insulin causes blindness.

  11. Eating too much sugar causes Type 2 diabetes.

Don't forget to check out the Beyond Type 2 website!

Encouraging Resources for May - Diabetes & Mental Health

We are nearing the end of Mental Health Awareness Month, but we couldn't have missed this important topic! From small, day-to-day stressors and burdens to larger scale, chronic mental health issues, everyone needs to create their own path to balance and stability. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes bring additional challenges to already complicated lives, but in the midst of this we can strive to find moments of peace, glimmers of light, and hope through connection.

At some point, you may find some encouragement in these resources:

ADA's Mental Health Provider Directory
(Mental health professionals who specialize in diabetes)

Beyond Type 1 Mental Health Resources Page
(Articles on Stress, Diabetes & Type 1, Diabetes Burnout, Diabulimia, Caregiver Burnout, Eating Disorders, Anxiety & Diabetes, Self-Care, and more)

NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness
(For a deeper dive on mental health issues and concerns)

Give These Insulin Pump Simulator Apps a Shot

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Researching your pump options? Here are some helpful tools from Tandem and Medtronic to help you understand the benefits of different insulin pumps on the market.

t:simulator App from Tandem
With the App, you can experience the touchscreen interface of the Tandem t:slim X2 Insulin Pump with Basal-IQ Technology using a smartphone or tablet. You can also enable "Tool Tips" for a tour of the pump's key features. The App provides info about the pump's technical specifications and access to a glossary of common terms for better understanding.

Download the t:simulator App at the bottom of this page.

MiniMed 670G System Simulator from Medtronic
This application provides step-by-step instructions on the different features of the 670G and 630G insulin pumps. There are training resources for both systems and the capability to explore the insulin pump through different functionality scenarios. You will find device feature videos that give more info about the Auto Mode and Suspend Before Low features.

Download the MiniMed System Simulator through Google Play or on the Apple App Store.

Awesome Beyond Type 2 Website Launches

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Check out the new Beyond Type 2 website , the sister site to Beyond Type 1 , a well-established favorite of ours. It is a beautiful site with excellent resources on a disease that will benefit from a fresh voice for information and support. I love the Recently Diagnosed? Learn the Lingo page to get started.

In the words of the Beyond Type 2 founders:

"Launched in 2019, Beyond Type 2 is a program of the nonprofit organization Beyond Type 1. Beyond Type 2 is a place for everyone impacted by Type 2 diabetes to share their stories, get connected to the community, and find resources on topics from daily management to mental health...Beyond Type 2 hopes to radically change what it means to live with Type 2 diabetes. We aim to unite the global community and empower everyone living with Type 2 to live beyond it. With the right resources, programs, and power of our combined voices, we can redefine what it means to be a person living with diabetes – of any type."

You won't regret taking some time with this website. Explore Beyond Type 2 at beyondtype2.org.

Grunberger Patient Appreciation Day a Great Success

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Despite the weather (pouring rain all day!), the Grunberger Diabetes Institute’s Patient Appreciation Day on Saturday, August 25 had an awesome turnout! Over 100 patients attended the event outside Dr. Grunberger’s office -- a fun, educational opportunity to understand what resources are available for diabetes care. Jennifer from Healthy Living Medical Supply attended the event, along with many of our manufacturer partners representing CGM and insulin pump solutions. The Grunberger Diabetes Institute also served food and sponsored a raffle for patients and guests.

Dr. George Grunberger is internationally renowned for his work with people with diabetes. His office is located in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and offers cutting-edge diabetes and endocrine problems management, one-stop service for comprehensive care, a multidisciplinary team, and participation in research studies. Learn more about the Grunberger Diabetes Institute and check out their blog.

Tandem’s Basal-IQ Predictive Low Glucose Suspend Now Available in t:slim X2 Insulin Pumps

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The Tandem Basal-IQ predictive low glucose suspend (PLGS) system has recently been approved by the FDA for pump users as young as six years old. It is a feature of the newest Tandem t:slim X2 insulin pumps (and available as a software update for older t:slim X2 pumps), working in collaboration with the Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitoring system (CGM). The new PLGS algorithm stops basal insulin delivery when low blood sugar is predicted (30 minutes ahead of time), suspends, and then restarts insulin delivery once blood sugar levels begin to rise. The goal is to prevent or reduce hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in users, without alarms.

The American Diabetes Association defines hypoglycemia: “Low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) is when your blood glucose levels have fallen low enough that you need to take action to bring them back to your target range. This is usually when your blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dL.” Study results have shown that the Tandem Basal-IQ predictive low glucose suspend system reduced time in hypoglycemia by 31%, or about 19 minutes per day. The Basal-IQ system is also the first automated insulin delivery system compatible with a no-fingerstick calibration CGM (the Dexcom G6).

All of the Tandem t:slim X2 pumps shipping from Healthy Living Medical Supply now have the updated Basal-IQ PLGS algorithm. If you already have a Tandem t:slim X2 pump and it’s in warranty, you will be able to get a software update to obtain the new algorithm. The Basal-IQ Technology software update for the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump is now available – get started here. The collective capabilities of insulin pumps and CGM keep wowing us! To find out more about new ways like this to help manage diabetes, call our Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy team at 866.779.8512 (option 2). We are here to help!

Healthy Living Salutes Diabetes Educators

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The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) annual conference just passed in Baltimore, Maryland. Healthy Living was there to meet diabetes educators and product manufacturers and to simply learn. Educators are in the trenches with patients and their families, teaching them the skills to be successful and guiding them in the various technologies and tools used to manage the disease.

Six diabetes educators were honored for their achievements and contributions in the field of diabetes education at the AADE conference:

  • Diabetes Educator of the Year Award - Jane K. Dickinson, RN, PhD, CDE

  • Lifetime Achievement Award - Keith Campbell, RPh, FASHP, CDE, FAAD (posthumous award)

  • Allene Van Son Distinguished Service Award - Malinda Peeples, RN, MS, CDE, FAADE

  • 2018 Strategic Initiative Award – Jasmine Gonzalvo, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, CDE, LDE, FAADE

  • Rising Star Awards - Melanie L. Duran, RN, BSN, CDE and Clipper F. Young, PharmD, MPH, BC-ADM, CDE

We support the work of diabetes educators on a daily basis by providing them with meter kits to use for new Healthy Living patients in the clinic during training. Healthy Living also reinforces the teaching of diabetes educators by making sure our patients receive refills for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) supplies, insulin pump supplies, and testing supplies on time, every 30 or 90 days (depending on the patient’s insurance plan).

What it comes down to is that patients can have the best technology in the world, but if they don’t have education, they won’t be able to take full advantage of an insulin pump or CGM system. Read the article New Diabetes Technology Options Can Ease Disease Management, but Education Key for more information about this. Diabetes educators are absolutely essential to the well-being and successful treatment plans of people with diabetes.

The Link Between Diabetes & Heart Disease

There is a substantial connection between diabetes and heart disease. In fact, the American Heart Association reports that if you have diabetes, your risk of developing heart disease is more than double that of the general population. To better understand how cardiovascular disease and diabetes interface in the human body, check out the video, Break It Down: Diabetes & Heart Disease and the associated healthline article. This video, featuring Dr. Priyanka Wali, explains the link between these two diseases and emphasizes that lifestyle changes can have a huge impact on improving health outcomes.

The main diabetes-related health characteristics that can increase the likelihood of cardiovascular disease include high blood pressure, high blood sugar, poorly managed levels of blood fats like cholesterol and triglycerides, obesity, and living a sedentary lifestyle. Dr. Wali recommends being attentive and proactive and making these seven changes to reduce the chances of developing cardiovascular disease:

  1. Quit smoking
  2. Get moving
  3. Reduce stress and get enough sleep
  4. Lose weight
  5. Know your numbers
  6. Optimize cholesterol levels
  7. Take medications as prescribed

Check out the healthline page, Get to the Heart of Type 2 Diabetes, for more related articles. Let’s keep reading, keep learning, and keep moving!

In the News: Saliva Test Could Improve Diabetes Control & Treatment

Recent studies have shown that proteins in saliva can reflect high blood sugar and associated disease processes in children and adolescents with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. This means that a simple saliva sample could replace blood tests to assess and monitor diabetes and can provide this information long before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Read the article for in-depth information on the research.

Co-author of the study, Professor Heleni Vastardis of NKU Athens School of Dentistry, explains, “The signs of diabetic pathology are already in place way before manifestation of clinical complications." This testing mechanism could lead to better prediction and prevention of long-term complications of diabetes.  

 

What We’re Reading: Facing Diabetes on Her Own Terms…from the HAP Blog

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We have been checking out the HAP Balanced Living blog and recently found this awesome article – Facing Diabetes on Her Own Terms: How One Woman Took Control of Her Life. This article is about Shannon, a woman diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, who found a way to manage her disease without medication, through motivation and focus.

Shannon had a family history of diabetes, so when she was diagnosed, she regarded the situation very seriously. She knew that she needed to make changes, and when she had a physically adverse reaction to metformin (a drug used to control blood sugar), she became determined to find an alternative to medication. To learn more about managing diabetes, Shannon took hospital-based classes for people recently diagnosed with the condition. Then, she also joined the diabetes prevention program at Henry Ford Macomb Hospital which provided great support and education.

Shannon also dove into exercise and improved her dietary choices. She started her exercise routine slowly to work around previous injuries, but she kept going. To adjust her diet, she looked at serving sizes and nutrition information about what she was eating. “The changes needed to battle diabetes can be overwhelming if you try to make them all at once,” Shannon explained, “Don’t be so strict that you set yourself up for failure.”

Healthy Living Medical Supply is in network with Health Alliance Plan of Michigan for diabetes testing suppliesinsulin pumps, insulin pump supplies, and continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGM). If you are a Health Alliance Plan of Michigan member and are looking for diabetes-related supplies delivered to your doorstep with great customer care, give us a call at 866.779.8512 or send us a text message at 248.577.9903 to start the easy enrollment process.

What We’re Reading: SmartSitters

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When leaving the house for a bit, it can be hard to trust the wellbeing of your child with a sitter whom you may not know well. Feeling confident to leave your daughter or son in someone else’s care can be even more difficult when your child has specific care considerations.

We found an awesome guide that can help you and prepare your sitter to give your child with T1D the best possible, most knowledgeable care while you are away. SmartSitters covers essential information about T1D to help families and sitters manage T1D together, wherever they are.

The SmartSitters guide includes a wealth of information, comprehensively covering details on defining diabetes, understanding insulin basics, monitoring glucose, and using an emergency glucagon kit. The guide is easy-to-read and has great pictures - definitely worth checking out!

Are You Ready for CGM?

A continuous glucose monitor is a small wearable device system that tracks your glucose throughout the day and night, notifying you of highs and lows so you can take action when needed. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) helps many people with diabetes obtain greater insight into what is happening with their blood sugar levels and trends.

Benefits of CGM  

  • The CGM system monitors blood glucose levels in the interstitial tissue every five minutes, offering much more information than four to eight finger sticks per day.
  • CGM is very useful when you are struggling with nighttime lows, providing alarms and alerts.
  • Continuous glucose monitoring is great for pediatrics because their parents and caregivers can remotely monitor the CGM data from their smartphones.
  • Both Medtronic and Dexcom sensors and transmitters are water-resistant, if not waterproof. They are both relatively small and discreet to wear.

CGM & Insurance Coverage

  • Most commercial insurances cover CGM, and the end of the year is a good time to consider CGM since at this time deductibles are often satisfied.
  • Most insurances require a prior authorization on file, so it is essential that patients meet with their endocrinologist to discuss CGM. This is a good first step for obtaining a CGM system. 
  • Currently, no Michigan Medicaid plans consistently approve CGM, and plans will require a pre-authorization if the CGM is covered.

Starting with CGM

  • It is easy to begin using CGM, and you don’t have to commit to an insulin pump. Many patients using multiple daily injections (MDI) report that they get tighter blood glucose through the combination of MDI and CGM.
  • From start to finish, a CGM enrollment will take commercial members roughly 1-14 days and Medicaid members 2-4 weeks.

Get in Touch

Healthy Living’s Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy Team can help guide you through the process of starting with CGM and will work with your insurance company. You can reach us at 866.779.8512 (Option 2). Learn more about CGM on our website.

We love to help!

New Research: Lack of Sleep Tied to Higher Risk of Diabetes in Kids

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A recent UK study suggests that children who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than kids who typically sleep longer. Each additional hour of sleep children get at night is associated with lower body weight, more lean muscle mass, and less accumulation of sugars in the blood. Since obesity and high blood sugars are contributing factors to developing type 2 diabetes, you can see the possible correlation.

This study, based on 4,525 children ages 9 or 10, found that kids who slept less were more likely to be extremely overweight or obese and have more body fat. Children who got less sleep on average per night were also more likely to have a risk factor called insulin resistance, where their bodies don’t respond normally to insulin. An additional factor, insufficient sleep also affects the level of hormones that control appetite, making kids hungrier and increasing cravings for sweet and salty snacks.

The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children ages 6 to 12 should get 9 to 12 hours of sleep each night. “Getting enough sleep helps keep our appetite in check and is protective against insulin resistance,” said James Gangwisch, a psychiatry researcher at Columbia University who wasn’t involved in the study.

Read the entire Reuters article.

Best of CGM – Essential Info from Our Most Helpful CGM Blogs

Dexcom & Medtronic CGM Systems (Photo by Emily Lewis)

Dexcom & Medtronic CGM Systems (Photo by Emily Lewis)

If you are living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) can help you make more informed treatment decisions that can lead to better glycemic control. Learn more about CGM through three of our most valuable blogs from the last year.

Blog 1: Try CGM for More Insights & Tighter Diabetes Monitoring

This article covers the basics and answers questions like:

  • Why is CGM so helpful?
  • How does CGM work?
  • How do insulin pumps and CGM work together?
  • Who can benefit from CGM?
  • How does Healthy Living help you get started with CGM?

Blog 2: The Top 11 Questions about CGM & What You Need to Know

This blog covers these more detailed questions:

  1. What information will I get from Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM)?
  2. Can I set a safe range for my blood glucose readings?
  3. Do I still have to test my blood sugar when I am using CGM?
  4. What parts make up a CGM system?
  5. Do I need an insulin pump to use CGM?
  6. What types of CGM systems are available right now?
  7. How long can I wear CGM sensors before I need to change them?
  8. Can I use the same insertion site for my insulin pump and CGM sensors?
  9. Can parents and other care team members access a patient’s CGM data?
  10. Can I view CGM data on a smartwatch?
  11. Is CGM covered by insurance?

Blog 3: Apple Watch’s Non-Invasive Glucose Tracker: Said to Become the "Holy Grail" in Diabetes

This blog describes what we currently know about the process and progress Apple is making in creating a continuous blood glucose sensor that does not break the skin to pair with the Apple Watch.

We love to help.

You can reach our Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy Team for more information via phone call at 866.779.8512 (Option 2) or text message at 248.577.9903.

CGM Basics: Clarifying the System & Benefits in 5 Questions

Checking CGM data on an iPhone, image from pexels.com.

Checking CGM data on an iPhone, image from pexels.com.

Over a big group dinner the other night, I found out that there is a considerable amount of confusion about both what CGM is and the differences between CGM and insulin pumps. Hopefully this blog will help shed some light on these questions!

1. What information will I get from Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM)?

CGM measures glucose in the tissue fluid throughout the day and night, about every five minutes, and sends the collected data to a receiver, phone, or insulin pump. This information can tell you how your glucose levels are trending, so you can make better decisions about your insulin dosing.

2. How can CGM help me manage diabetes better?

A continuous glucose monitor is a small wearable device system that tracks your glucose throughout the day and night, notifying you of highs and lows so you can take action. A CGM system consists of 3 parts:

  • Small, under-the-skin sensor that measures glucose levels
  • Transmitter that attaches to the sensor and transmits data
  • Receiver that displays real-time glucose information

3. Are there additional benefits of CGM?

Continuous glucose monitoring can help you make the best possible decisions since you'll be able to see your trend data provided by the CGM instead of basing choices only on a number from a blood glucose meter reading. You can also set thresholds for high and low numbers, and the CGM will alert you when it senses your glucose levels have moved out of the safe range you set.

4. Is CGM covered by insurance?

Yes, CGM is covered by many insurance plans. Our Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy Team can help you obtain a prescription from your doctor, navigate the insurance verification process, and place your CGM system order. They also help customers with CGM supply refills.

5. What is the difference between CGM & insulin pumps?

Continuous glucose monitoring collects information on your blood glucose levels. This information can be used for proper insulin dosing through your insulin pump. CGM and insulin pumps can be used separately (a person can use just one or the other) or together.

 

Can Turmeric Help Manage Diabetes? What the Evidence Says…

Curcumin, which is found in the spice turmeric, has been found to help control blood sugar, improve insulin sensitivity, reduce diabetes-related complications, and even prevent diabetes. Check out this article to learn about turmeric, a potential positive addition to your existing diabetes management plan.

Advanced Insulin Pump Workshop Offers Great New Insights

A few weeks ago, when Healthy Living attended the JDRF TypeOneNation Summit in Belleville, our team members chose different breakout sessions to attend. We all learned a lot, and I want to take some time to pool our knowledge and share it with you!

Our Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy team attended a workshop that went in depth on insulin pump therapy, presented by Dr. Lowell Schmeltz. Here are some of the things that Crystal and George learned from the course.

Advanced Features Improve Results

Insulin pumps include many advanced features and functions that patients searching for tighter control of their diabetes can utilize. These optional features can make pumping more complicated, but if used correctly can greatly improve the results of pump therapy.  One example is that some pumps offer is a dual-wave bolus, which contains a normal bolus as well as a second wave of insulin that is delivered over time. This is especially beneficial when eating foods that are high in fat and carbs, like pizza.

Insulin Pump Therapy Requires Focus

Pump users and caregivers need to remember a lot of information and continually go through a number of steps to maintain control with their insulin pumps. Dr. Schmeltz explained that the biggest issue that comes up for individuals using the pump goes back to the basics – entering their carbs for meals. He believes that people should read packages and measure their food for accurate carb counting (instead of estimates and guesses).

Simplifying for Encouragement

Dr. Schmeltz really engaged with attendees and had a great way of simplifying complicated concepts to make pump users feel comfortable with the idea of trying new things. One more of his recommendations was for patients to download their pump data between physician visits so their doctor can review their status at appointment time and make any necessary changes to their regimen.

We also were excited to learn about some of the new pump technology that is being tested, including the artificial pancreas. This new technology is much closer to being available to patients than many of us realized!