Type 1 Diabetes

The Top 11 Questions about CGM & What You Need to Know

If you are living with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) can help you make more informed treatment decisions that can lead to better glycemic control. 

Top 11 Questions about CGM

1. What information will I get from Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM)?

CGM measures glucose in the tissue fluid throughout the day and night, about every five minutes, and sends the collected data to a receiver, phone, or insulin pump. This information can tell you how your glucose levels are trending, so you can make better decisions about your insulin dosing.

2. Can I set a ‘safe range’ for my blood glucose readings?

You can set thresholds for high and low numbers, and the CGM will alert you when it senses your glucose levels have moved out of the range you set.

3. Do I still have to test my blood sugar when I am using CGM?

With CGM, to calibrate the sensor, you will still have to test your blood sugar 2-4 times per day, depending on the CGM system you have.

4. What parts make up a CGM system?

A CGM system consists of three parts:

  • A small under-the-skin sensor that measures glucose levels
  • A transmitter that attaches to the sensor and transmits data
  • A receiver that displays real-time glucose information

5. Do I need an insulin pump to use CGM?

No – although some CGM systems can tie in with a pump, CGM can be used independently.

6. What types of CGM systems are available right now?

Medtronic and Dexcom both offer CGM systems with different features.

7. How long can I wear CGM sensors before I need to change them?

You can wear sensors for 5-7 days, depending on which CGM system you are using.

8. Can I use the same insertion site for my insulin pump and CGM sensors?

No, CGM and an insulin pump require two different sites.

9. Can parents and other care team members access a patient’s CGM data?

Yes, certain models of CGM systems are compatible with the iPhone to allow care team members to remotely monitor CGM data via text alerts and/or an iPhone app. This can be especially helpful to parents who have children with diabetes, as they can monitor their blood sugar levels from afar (for example, the daughter is at school and her dad is at work).

10. Can I view CGM data on a smartwatch?

Yes, Dexcom G5 will display CGM on an Apple Watch. Visit Dexcom's Apple Watch page to learn more.

11. Is CGM covered by insurance?

Yes, CGM is covered by many insurance plans. Our Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy Team can help you obtain a prescription from your doctor, navigate the insurance verification process, and place your CGM system order. They also help customers with CGM supply refills.

You can reach George and Crystal on the Healthy Living Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy Team at (866)779-8512 (Option 2) and learn more about CGM and the systems we offer at myhlms.com/cgm.

Telling the Truth about 8 Insulin Pump Therapy Myths

The Healthy Living Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy Team receives all kinds of questions every day. I sat down with them to learn more about what ‘myths’ or misconceptions people have about insulin pumps. Then, we figured out the best way to explain the truth of the situation!

#1

Myth: An insulin pump is implanted in the body and requires surgery to get started.

Fact: Insulin pumps are worn outside of the body as devices and are attached to a removable site that the patient changes every three days.

#2

Myth: Insulin pumps are big and bulky.

Fact: An insulin pump is about the same size as a small flip phone or a pager (and about half the size of a regular cell phone).

#3

Myth: Pumps are permanent.

Fact: Insulin pumps are removable and can be taken off for showering or swimming, but back-up insulin (shots) must be used.

#4

Myth: With an insulin pump, there is no longer a need to test blood sugar.

Fact: When using an insulin pump, patients still need to test their blood and count carbs. It is recommended to test blood sugars at least four times daily.

#5

Myth: Someone needs to be ‘tech savvy’ to figure out how to use an insulin pump.

Fact: If you can operate a cell phone or remote control, you should be able to work with an insulin pump. Thankfully, pump manufacturers offer great customer support and training.

#6

Myth: Using an insulin pump is more painful than multiple daily injections.

Fact: Inserting an insulin pump site hurts about the same as one shot, but the site only must be changed every three days. The frequency works out to well over 1,000 shots a year with multiple daily injections (MDI), with a little over 100 insertions a year with an insulin pump.

#7

Myth: Pumps are only used for people with Type 1 Diabetes.

Fact: Many insurances cover insulin pumps for people with Type 2 Diabetes, and insulin pump therapy can be a great contribution to the work of managing T2D.

#8

Myth: Insurance won’t cover insulin pumps.

Fact: Our Insulin Pump & CGM Therapy Team can work with customers, their doctors, and their insurance companies to help people with diabetes obtain insurance-covered pumps. Call Crystal and George at (866)779-8512 (Option 2) to check out your options.

WE LOVE TO HELP.

  • Call us @ (866)779-8512 or text us @ (248)577-9903.
  • Reach us through online chat at myhlms.com.
  • Sign up for the Healthy Living Blog at myhlms.com/subscribe.
  • Check out our online store at store.myhlms.com for accessories and over-the-counter medications.
  • Visit myhlms.com/providers to electronically complete and sign prescriptions for patients.

JDRF Teen Carnival Brings Fun & Collaboration

Giant Connect Four at the Healthy LIving Medical Supply table.

Giant Connect Four at the Healthy LIving Medical Supply table.

About 30 teens and family members attended the 3rd Annual JDRF Teen Carnival last Saturday, January 28 in Belleville, Michigan. Matt Montagne, Healthy Living’s VP of Strategy and Innovation, went to the event to contribute to the fun (he brought giant versions of Connect 4, Jenga, and Yahtzee) and to learn from the inspiring Type 1 Diabetes community.

Teens had the opportunity to break out and share their experiences, and so did parents and caregivers. The two groups came together to summarize what they discussed and shared their thoughts about strategies for improving communication around diabetes management, including:

·        Avoiding judgment

·        Using humor

·        Letting go from time to time

·        Testing blood sugar regularly and teens keeping up ‘their end of the bargain’

Matt also spoke with a Health Plus family and learned about their disappointment that Healthy Living couldn’t continue handling their supply needs after the Health Plus roll-over into HAP. He let them know that we are working on getting in network with HAP, and if they ever switch insurances, they should contact us (at (866)779-8512) to see if we are in-network. 

As always, JDRF put on an amazing event! The next JDRF event that we are gearing up for is the 9th Annual JDRF Type One Nation Summit on May 14th at Wayne County Community College's Western Campus.

WE MAKE MANAGING YOUR DIABETES SUPPLIES EASY.

  • We work with many insurance plan partners.
  • You can approve your refills via text or phone.
  • Our company’s focus is excellence in customer service.
  • In addition to providing supplies, we also have a mail-order pharmacy.
  • Diabetes is our specialty, and we’re prepared to help!

WE LOVE TO HELP.

  • Sign up for the Healthy Living Blog at myhlms.com/subscribe.
  • Call us @ (866)779-8512 or text us @ (248)577-9903.
  • Reach us through online chat at myhlms.com.
  • Check out our online store at myhlms.com/shop for accessories and over-the-counter medications.
  • Visit myhlms.com/providers to electronically complete and sign prescriptions for patients.